Pulitizer Prize Judges Agree: Fiction Is Not Worth Reading

For the first time in 35 years, the Pulitzer Prize judges did not award a work of fiction.  This, despite that fact that three very good finalists were up for consideration.  They were, the late David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King, Karen Russell’s Swamplandia and Denis Johnson’s Train Dreams.

Needless to say, the Pulitzer committee beat a hasty retreat with no explanation given.  No doubt for the obvious reason that they could not string a sentence of explanation together themselves, or, for that matter, recognize a good sentence if it was presented to them.  It’s quite sad, in this reader’s honest opinion, that when the average person reads fewer and fewer books every year the Pulitzer Prize committee seems to agree with the majority of the population which is constantly saying:  “There is nothing worth reading”.  Or, even worse, “It is not worth your time to read.”

But…perhaps I am too harsh?  Maybe the Pulitzer judges were simply too busy.  They were probably so terribly caught up in The Hunger Games trilogy that they simply did not have time to read these three excellent finalists.

Since they can’t seem to do their own job, does anyone mind terribly if I do it?  This years Pulitzer Prize for fiction…no, wait, what am I thinking?  Scratch that.  Who cares about the Pulitzer now anyway?  This years Persnickety Reader’s prize for fiction goes to The Pale King, by the late David Foster Wallace.

Enough said.

The Elements of Style

If language has a holiday, does that mean today we can stop fussing over how we say what we have to say? Well, today is National Grammar Day and for my part I can only hope the name alone is enough to cause bloggers, texters, and twitterers to stop in their tracks since, sadly, as our methods of communications change, the very idea of “rules” for language have fallen by the wayside.  With this in mind, today is probably an excellent opportunity to pause and consider the simple, but brilliant, book by William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White which has been the standard “how to” for over fifty years.  Fear not, it isn’t a dry manual of rules and regulations.  It is an eloquently simple book.  Pick it up and put it out and have it on hand.  Consult it as you might a much-loved cookbook.  There’s even a recent edition with illustrations by the great Maira Kalman to help you along.  Note to self: Blog Maira Kalman.  She is a genius.

“A schoolchild should be taught grammar–for the same reason that a medical student should study anatomy. Having learned about the exciting mysteries of an English sentence, the child can then go forth and speak and write any damn way he pleases.”
― E.B. WhiteWritings from the New Yorker 1927-1976