Pulitizer Prize Judges Agree: Fiction Is Not Worth Reading

For the first time in 35 years, the Pulitzer Prize judges did not award a work of fiction.  This, despite that fact that three very good finalists were up for consideration.  They were, the late David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King, Karen Russell’s Swamplandia and Denis Johnson’s Train Dreams.

Needless to say, the Pulitzer committee beat a hasty retreat with no explanation given.  No doubt for the obvious reason that they could not string a sentence of explanation together themselves, or, for that matter, recognize a good sentence if it was presented to them.  It’s quite sad, in this reader’s honest opinion, that when the average person reads fewer and fewer books every year the Pulitzer Prize committee seems to agree with the majority of the population which is constantly saying:  “There is nothing worth reading”.  Or, even worse, “It is not worth your time to read.”

But…perhaps I am too harsh?  Maybe the Pulitzer judges were simply too busy.  They were probably so terribly caught up in The Hunger Games trilogy that they simply did not have time to read these three excellent finalists.

Since they can’t seem to do their own job, does anyone mind terribly if I do it?  This years Pulitzer Prize for fiction…no, wait, what am I thinking?  Scratch that.  Who cares about the Pulitzer now anyway?  This years Persnickety Reader’s prize for fiction goes to The Pale King, by the late David Foster Wallace.

Enough said.

Happy 96th Beverly Cleary!

I’m not saying I wouldn’t have had some kind of childhood without the books of Beverly Cleary, but I think it’s fair to say it might not have been much of one.  And I’m sure I’m not the only person who feels this way.  Henry Huggins, his dog Ribsy, Beezus and Ramona and all the other children and residents of Klickitat Street were sometimes more real to me than the world outside my own front door.  From the introduction of Henry Huggins in 1950 Beverly Cleary has probably done more for children’s literature, or literature in general for that matter, than any other author.  For the first time children could finally pick up her books and read about children just like themselves.  And that’s no small accomplishment.  So it’s no wonder that along the way Beverly Cleary has won three Newbery Awards.  A National Medal of Arts.  And The Library of Congress has named her a Living Legend.  Today she is 96.  Happy Birthday Beverly, from Henry, Ribsy, Beezus, Ramona, and me.  As well as countless children around the world whose lives and hearts you touched.

“Quite often somebody will say, ‘What year do your books take place?’ and the only answer I can give is, in childhood.”
― Beverly Cleary

Off The Menu – Staff Meals From America’s Top Restaurants

Admittedly, I love to eat far more than I love to cook so I am the first to suggest the nearest restaurant, especially one I haven’t tried yet.  And often while reading the menu I’ve wondered what the chefs, sous chefs, line cooks, managers, dishwashers and staff have gathered together to eat hours before opening.  So it’s little wonder this book intrigued me, as the idea of a behind-the-scenes look into America’s most favorite kitchens seemed sure not to disappoint.

Happily it doesn’t.  There are over fifty restaurants profiled here and along with many recipes of the meals that staff prepare and serve to themselves there are also some great interviews with chefs, tips for dining out, and many fascinating photos of some of America’s most legendary kitchens.

The author, Marissa Guggiana has selected farm to table restaurants from across the country.  It’s clear they all honor and respect the local produce and livestock in their area.

While I’ve yet to eat in many of these restaurants you can bet if I find myself in any of these cities I am making a reservation.

The meals themselves range from small plates to multi-course meals, some using the leftovers on hand, others all new ingredients.  Bon appétit!

Bossypants – 5 Reasons To Love Tina Fey

First let me say that I am funny.  No.  Really.  I am.  I am funny.  Ok, well, maybe not funny funny, but funny in that dark, dry, omg did he/she really say that kind of way.  But, sadly, I am not — I repeat NOT — Tina Fey funny.  And perhaps no one is.  Which, of course, is what makes Tina Fey so…well…funny.  And so, without further ado, here are 5 Reasons to love Tina Fey.  Which you can later prove by running out and buying your edition of Bossypants.  And reading it.  Preferably alone, so no one will see you snort milk through your nose or change your Depends.

1. Tina Fey knows you can not “have it all” and has accepted it.

“There was no prolonged stretch of time in sight when it would just be the baby and me.  And then I sobbed in my office for ten minutes.  The same ten minutes that magazines urge me to use for sit-ups and triceps dips, I used for sobbing.  Of course I’m not supposed to admit that there is a tri-annual torrential sobbing in my office, because it’s bad for the feminist cause.  It makes it harder for women to be taken seriously in the workplace. It makes it harder for other working moms to justify their choice.  But I have friends who stay home with their kids and they also have a tri-annual sob, so I think we should call it even.  I think we should be kind to one another about it.  I think we should agree to blame the children.”

2. Tina Fey knows where she stands.

“My only other request was this: I never wanted to appear in a “two shot” with Mrs. Palin.  I mean, she really is taller and better looking than I am, and we would literally be wearing the same outfit.  I’d already been made to stand next to Jennifer Aniston and Salma Hayek on camera in my life; a gal can only take so much.  And honestly, I knew that if that picture existed, it would be what they show on the Emmys someday when I die…”

3. Tina Fey has perspective.

“If you retain nothing else, always remember the most important Rule of Beauty.

‘Who cares?’ “

4. Tina Fey knows how to get what she wants. And works for it.

“If I was really ambitious, I would get a Whopper Jr. at Burger King and then walk to McDonald’s to get the fries.  The shake could be from anywhere.”

5. Tina Fey had a worse, and funnier, childhood than you.

I shoved the box in my closet, where it haunted me daily. There might as well have been a guy dressed like Freddy Krueger in there for the amount of anxiety it gave me.  Every time I reached in the closet to grab a Sunday school dress or my colonial-lady Halloween costume that I sometimes relaxed in after school — ‘Modessssss,’ it hissed at me.  ‘Modessssssis coming for you.’ “

Obviously I could go on and on.  But I won’t.  Thankfully, Tina Fey does.  Read Bossypants.  That is an order.

Down The Garden Path

I’m just going to admit it.  I am a huge fan of Beverley Nichols.  Whenever winter wanes and I begin to venture out into the spongy soil I think of the Jazz Age playboy turned gardener, a cigarette in one hand, cocktail shaker in the other, walking down the rows of the chalky and sullen soil he turned into a bit of paradise in Huntingdonshire in the 1930’s.  Surely, I think, if he could make a garden out of a stubborn piece of earth I ought to be able to grow a row of veg and a flower or two.  And if I can’t, I always have his acid wit to turn to in the gardening memoirs he wrote and that is enough to comfort and amuse me.

For those who don’t know, and I don’t know why many would, Beverley Nichols was a popular British author of plays, mysteries, poems and children’s books when he bought and began to renovate a home and garden in the village of Glatton.  He sat down to write about it and in virtually no time produced what is referred to as the Always Trilogy, which is composed of the three books featured here.  That anyone could write about a garden with such wit and irony is a constant source of enjoyment and as the trilogy progresses we move from the garden to his home to the village and all its many colorful inhabitants.

A Thatched Roof is the second book in the trilogy.  The books have been in almost constant print since their publication but these new editions from the Timber Press are very worth tracking down.  If you can’t find them anywhere else, you can certainly find them at http://www.timberpress.com.

It’s always sad to come to the end of a series but don’t despair.  Nichols produced a second trilogy between 1951-1956 about his renovation of a Georgian Manor house that is absolutely hilarious.

My prediction?  If you become as addicted as I am you will soon find your shelves filling with these fine editions.

“Do you not realize that the whole thing is miraculous? It is exactly as though you were to cut off your wife’s leg, stick it in the lawn, and be greeted on the following day by an entirely new woman, sprung from the leg, advancing across the lawn to meet you.

Surely, you would be surprised if, having snipped off your little finger, and pushed it into a flower-pot, you were to find a miniature edition of yourself in the flower-pot a day later.”

— Beverley Nichols 1898-1983